Friday, April 4, 2008

HENRY BESTON QUOTE:

We need another and a wiser and perhaps a more mystical concept of animals. Remote from universal nature, and living by complicated artifice, man in civilization surveys the creature through the glass of his knowledge and sees thereby a feather magnified and the whole image in distortion. We patronize them for their incompleteness, for their tragic fate of having taken form so far below ourselves. And therein we err, and greatly err. For the animal shall not be measured by man. In a world older and more complete than ours they move finished and complete, gifted with extensions of the senses we have lost or never attained, living by voices we shall never hear. They are not brethren, they are not underlings; they are other nations caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendour and travail of the earth.

Tuesday, March 4, 2008

Who Wants to be a Millionaire? By Rebecca Stone


Six little numbers is all it would take.

Oh what a difference those six numbers would make.

Why, I would give up my job and live like a queen

and visit the places that I've never seen.


I would buy a big house with its own swimming pool,

party all night and act like a fool,

I would wear the best clothes money could buy,

buy my own plane and learn how to fly.


I would do all the things that I've never done

like ski in the snow and bask in the sun.

I would wear diamond rings that sparkle and shine

I could do as I pleased, the choice would be mine.


hey...... but wait a minute


What of my friends if I left them behind?

If I travelled the world, no better I'd find

and if I gave up work, yes I'd sure miss the mob,

so it's better, I think to hold on to my job.


I don't need a big house, why I'd feel out of place

and whatever would I do with that extra space.

To buy expensive clothes would just be a crime

where would I wear them? I'm at work all the time!


To fly my own plane with flashing lights?

Who am I kidding, I can't even stand heights.

I would probably pass out and make such a fuss

so I think I'll stick to the number 8 bus.


As for skiing, I guess I'm a little too old.

If there's one thing I hate it's the freezing cold.

So skiing is out, let's forget the peaks.

Why, if I broke a leg I'd be off work for weeks.


So why do I need to win lots of money,

to sit down and count it, that would be funny.

I should be grateful for the things I have got

and accept that I'm poor and that's my lot.


hey......but wait a minute


I work all the week and that's a right pain

and the day I get off it pours down with rain.

I have lots of mates and their problems they share

by the end of the day I could pull out my hair.


It's all work and no play, every day is the same

by the end of the week you forget your own name.

You have the boss on your back and targets to meet.

You're standing all day and get corns on your feet.


Money is tight and the larder is bare,

my flat is so cramped I could never share.

I relax for a while, help is on its way.

At the end of the month I at least get my pay.


"I can't take anymore" I always blubber,

The money's almost gone, I soon discover.

So weighing things up I seem to find

yet once again I've changed my mind.


well...................


Friends come and go and life's a real bitch,

so lord let me be stone filthy rich.

Just send me six numbers its easy for you

just five and the bonus ball please... that will do!

Sunday, February 3, 2008

Casey at the Bat by Ernest Lawrence Thayer




The outlook wasn't brilliant for the Mudville nine that day;


The score stood four to two, with but one inning more to play,


And then when Cooney died at first, and Barrows did the same,


A pall-like silence fell upon the patrons of the game.




A straggling few got up to go in deep despair. The rest


Clung to that hope which springs eternal in the human breast;


They thought, "If only Casey could but get a whack at that--


We'd put up even money now, with Casey at the bat."




But Flynn preceded Casey, as did also Jimmy Blake,


And the former was a hoodoo, while the latter was a cake;


So upon that stricken multitude grim melancholy sat,


For there seemed but little chance of Casey getting to the bat.




But Flynn let drive a single, to the wonderment of all,


And Blake, the much despis├Ęd, tore the cover off the ball;


And when the dust had lifted, and men saw what had occurred,


There was Jimmy safe at second and Flynn a-hugging third.




Then from five thousand throats and more there rose a lusty yell;


It rumbled through the valley, it rattled in the dell;


It pounded on the mountain and recoiled upon the flat,


For Casey, mighty Casey, was advancing to the bat.




There was ease in Casey's manner as he stepped into his place;


There was pride in Casey's bearing and a smile lit Casey's face.


And when, responding to the cheers, he lightly doffed his hat,


No stranger in the crowd could doubt 'twas Casey at the bat.




Ten thousand eyes were on him as he rubbed his hands with dirt;


Five thousand tongues applauded when he wiped them on his shirt;


Then while the writhing pitcher ground the ball into his hip,


Defiance flashed in Casey's eye, a sneer curled Casey's lip.




And now the leather-covered sphere came hurtling through the air,


And Casey stood a-watching it in haughty grandeur there.


Close by the sturdy batsman the ball unheeded sped--


"That ain't my style," said Casey. "Strike one!" the umpire said.




From the benches, black with people, there went up a muffled roar,


Like the beating of the storm-waves on a stern and distant shore;


"Kill him! Kill the umpire!" shouted some one on the stand;


And it's likely they'd have killed him had not Casey raised his hand.




With a smile of Christian charity great Casey's visage shone;


He stilled the rising tumult; he bade the game go on;


He signaled to the pitcher, and once more the dun sphere flew;


But Casey still ignored it, and the umpire said, "Strike two!"




"Fraud!" cried the maddened thousands, and echo answered "Fraud!


"But one scornful look from Casey and the audience was awed.


They saw his face grow stern and cold, they saw his muscles strain,


And they knew that Casey wouldn't let that ball go by again.




The sneer has fled from Casey's lip, his teeth are clenched in hate;


He pounds with cruel violence his bat upon the plate.


And now the pitcher holds the ball, and now he lets it go.


And now the air is shattered by the force of Casey's blow.




Oh, somewhere in this favored land the sun is shining bright;


The band is playing somewhere, and somewhere hearts are light,


And somewhere men are laughing, and little children shout;


But there is no joy in Mudville--great Casey has struck out.








Thursday, January 17, 2008

Verse For a Certain Dog by Dorothy Parker


Such glorious faith as fills your limpid eyes,


Dear little friend of mine, I never knew.


All-innocent are you, and yet all-wise.


(For Heaven's sake, stop worrying that shoe!)


You look about, and all you see is fair;


This mighty globe was made for you alone.


Of all the thunderous ages, you're the heir.


(Get off the pillow with that dirty bone!)




A skeptic world you face with steady gaze;


High in young pride you hold your noble head,


Gayly you meet the rush of roaring days.


(Must you eat puppy biscuit on the bed?)


Lancelike your courage, gleaming swift and strong,


Yours the white rapture of a winged soul,


Yours is a spirit like a Mayday song.


(God help you, if you break the goldfish bowl!)




"Whatever is, is good" - your gracious creed.


You wear your joy of living like a crown.


Love lights your simplest act, your every deed.


(Drop it, I tell you- put that kitten down!)


You are God's kindliest gift of all - a friend.


Your shining loyalty unflecked by doubt,


You ask but leave to follow to the end.


(Couldn't you wait until I took you out?)

Wednesday, January 9, 2008

THE HIGHWAYMAN by Alfred Noyes



The wind was a torrent of darkness upon the gusty trees,

The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas,

The road was a ribbon of moonlight looping the purple moor,

And the highwayman came riding--

Riding--riding--

The highwayman came riding, up to the old inn door.


He'd a French cocked hat on his forehead, and a bunch of lace at his chin;
He'd a coat of the claret velvet, and breeches of fine doe-skin.

They fitted with never a wrinkle; his boots were up to his thigh!

And he rode with a jeweled twinkle--

His rapier hilt a-twinkle--

His pistol butts a-twinkle, under the jeweled sky.


Over the cobbles he clattered and clashed in the dark inn-yard,

He tapped with his whip on the shutters, but all was locked and barred,

He whistled a tune to the window, and who should be waiting there

But the landlord's black-eyed daughter--

Bess, the landlord's daughter--

Plaiting a dark red love-knot into her long black hair.


Dark in the dark old inn-yard a stable-wicket creaked

Where Tim, the ostler listened--his face was white and peaked--

His eyes were hollows of madness, his hair like mouldy hay,

But he loved the landlord's daughter--

The landlord's black-eyed daughter;

Dumb as a dog he listened, and he heard the robber say:


"One kiss, my bonny sweetheart; I'm after a prize tonight,

But I shall be back with the yellow gold before the morning light.

Yet if they press me sharply, and harry me through the day,

Then look for me by moonlight,

Watch for me by moonlight,

I'll come to thee by moonlight, though hell should bar the way."


He stood upright in the stirrups; he scarce could reach her hand,

But she loosened her hair in the casement! His face burnt like a brand

As the sweet black waves of perfume came tumbling o'er his breast,

Then he kissed its waves in the moonlight

(O sweet black waves in the moonlight!),

And he tugged at his reins in the moonlight, and galloped away to the west.


He did not come in the dawning; he did not come at noon.

And out of the tawny sunset, before the rise of the moon,

When the road was a gypsy's ribbon over the purple moor,

The redcoat troops came marching--

Marching--marching--

King George's men came marching, up to the old inn-door.


They said no word to the landlord; they drank his ale instead,

But they gagged his daughter and bound her to the foot of her narrow bed.
Two of them knelt at her casement, with muskets by their side;

There was Death at every window,

And Hell at one dark window,

For Bess could see, through her casement, the road that he would ride.


They had bound her up at attention, with many a sniggering jest!

They had tied a rifle beside her, with the barrel beneath her breast!

"Now keep good watch!" and they kissed her. She heard the dead man say,
"Look for me by moonlight,

Watch for me by moonlight,

I'll come to thee by moonlight, though Hell should bar the way."


She twisted her hands behind her, but all the knots held good!

She writhed her hands till her fingers were wet with sweat or blood!

They stretched and strained in the darkness, and the hours crawled by like years,

Till, on the stroke of midnight,

Cold on the stroke of midnight,

The tip of one finger touched it! The trigger at least was hers!


The tip of one finger touched it, she strove no more for the rest;

Up, she stood up at attention, with the barrel beneath her breast.

She would not risk their hearing, she would not strive again,

For the road lay bare in the moonlight,

Blank and bare in the moonlight,

And the blood in her veins, in the moonlight, throbbed to her love's refrain.


Tlot tlot, tlot tlot! Had they heard it? The horse-hooves, ringing clear;

Tlot tlot, tlot tlot, in the distance! Were they deaf that they did not hear?
Down the ribbon of moonlight, over the brow of the hill,

The highwayman came riding--

Riding--riding--

The redcoats looked to their priming! She stood up straight and still.


Tlot tlot, in the frosty silence! Tlot tlot, in the echoing night!

Nearer he came and nearer! Her face was like a light!

Her eyes grew wide for a moment, she drew one last deep breath,

Then her finger moved in the moonlight--

Her musket shattered the moonlight--

Shattered her breast in the moonlight and warned him--with her death.


He turned, he spurred to the West; he did not know who stood

Bowed, with her head o'er the casement, drenched in her own red blood!
Not till the dawn did he hear it, and his face grew grey to hear

How Bess, the landlord's daughter,

The landlord's black-eyed daughter,

Had watched for her love in the moonlight, and died in the darkness there.


Back, he spurred like a madman, shrieking a curse to the sky,

With the white road smoking behind him and his rapier brandished high!
Blood-red were his spurs in the golden noon, wine-red was his velvet coat
When they shot him down in the highway,

Down like a dog in the highway,

And he lay in his blood in the highway, with the bunch of lace at his throat.


And still on a winter's night, they say, when the wind is in the trees,

When the moon is a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas,

When the road is a gypsy's ribbon looping the purple moor,

The highwayman comes riding--

Riding--riding--

The highwayman comes riding, up to the old inn-door.


Over the cobbles he clatters and clangs in the dark inn-yard,

He taps with his whip on the shutters, but all is locked and barred,

He whistles a tune to the window, and who should be waiting there

But the landlord's black-eyed daughter--

Bess, the landlord's daughter--

Plaiting a dark red love-knot into her long black hair.

Sunday, January 6, 2008

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